Critique

7 Best YouTube Shows To Improve Your Filmmaking

KyleKallgrenBHH

Described as “A mildly immature look at movies and movie-related nonsense”, Brows Held High features host and creator Kyle Kallgren analyzing the best, and worst of what art house cinema has to offer. In the main show, Kallgren investigates films like Shame, the infamous Trash Humpers, Gerry, and Cloud Atlas among others. That’s not all, he also does a smaller series entitled Between the Lines in which he takes a figure or film that is iconic in pop culture and charts all of the reasons that it has become so popular. A highlight of the series is his video on whether Inception is surrealism, charting each of director Christopher Nolan’s influences while making the film, to the nature of film itself. Brows Held High is essential viewing for aspiring filmmakers that are obsessed with the story behind the art.

A highlight of the series is his video on whether Inception is surrealism, charting each of director Christopher Nolan’s influences while making the film, to the nature of film itself. Brows Held High is essential viewing for aspiring filmmakers that are obsessed with the story behind the art.

Nerdwriter

Nerdwriter is a show that takes one specific aspect of a piece of art and analysis why it works. While it’s not exclusively a movie show, it does frequently use film as a platform for discussing certain ideas. Highlights include: “Logan: Superhero Movies Get Old”, in which Logan is used to charting the changes of the superhero genre. “Helms Deep: How to Film an Epic Battle”, breaks down all of the components Peter Jackson uses to construct one of cinema’s best set pieces. Each of these videos spotlights a different tool that aspiring filmmakers can use to tell their stories in a creative and impactful way.

Renegade Cut

Renegade Cut is similar to Brows Held High but is more open to the films, and film theory it considers. Rather than a reviewing platform, Renegade Cut uses film analysis to investigate narrative frameworks, and whether the films in question utilize them well. The most common topics are how certain films frame political and social issues. Examples include Avatar and its use of the White Saviour trope, a series of videos breaking down the films of David Lynch, and the dystopic consequences of Mad Max Fury Road

Rossatron

Rossatron is a channel for action movie buffs as he takes a look at action films, old and new, and how the genre has evolved over the years. Anyone who wants to make action cinema could do a lot worse than peruse these videos. Through his analysis, Rossatron uncovers the best uses of action in movies, whether its gun fights, the visceral nature of knife fights, the exhilaration of a car chase done right, or the best way to film hand to hand combat.

Lessons from a Screenplay

“I believe that a more informed audience raises the bar for storytelling. That examining the techniques used to tell great stories makes your own writing better and your appreciation for the stories deeper.”

This is the mission statement of Lessons from a Screenplay, an absolutely essential channel for every budding scriptwriter. Through expert analysis, Lessons from a Screenplay does exactly what it says on the tin: breaks down popular screenplays to show their strengths. Whether it’s Ex Machina’s Control of Information, The Shining with everyone going insane together, or the art of adapting Arrival, there is an abundance of exciting lessons to learn.

Folding Ideas

Created by filmmaker Dan Olson, Folding Ideas uses pop culture such as movies, TV, and games to talk about narrative theory and how popular culture is used to convey these ideas and their effects. This kind of analysis, like the toxic masculinity of Fight Club, to the Art of Editing Suicide Squad, and Violence as Narrative, Olsen breaks down what makes these art forms tick and their wider impact on our world, and our discourse. This is an essential channel for any filmmaker who wants to learn how to convey their themes, and their stories in a way that will make sense to their audience.

Every Frame a Painting

Ever wondered what as the best way to construct visual comedy? How to use silence in an eerie and powerful way? When to cut to another shot while editing> Well Every Frame a Painting has you covered. From analyzing the films of famous directors like Spielberg, Edgar Wright, Martin Scorsese, and even Michael Bay, Every Frame a Painting teaches you how to implement the tools of these masterful artists in your own work.

 

Contributor: Kevin Michael Boyle

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